Why Real Estate “Could” Be a Better Investment Than Stocks

Hi….Thanks for taking time to checkout this somewhat timely article I saw today on US News & World Report.  I cut and pasted into my blog to save you from the super annoying video ads that kept running out of nowhere…Man, those vids bug me!  Sorry, I digress….As I was saying,
this piece about why real estate is usually a safe "long term" bet spoke volumes.  With the Stock Market craziness over the last few days, some
of my stockbroker friends have been sending out "Settle down…everything is OK" emails to clients.  That seems like a good time to drop one of my own discussing the "safe" investment real estate can be.  Feel free to call or email if you have questions or would like to discuss some long term investement strategy.  There are quite a few solid investment properties available right now.  You just have to get someone on your team that knows where to look….In case you're wondering…Yes, I know a guy. 
Have a great week…Enjoy!  SS

By Kristin McFarland – US News & World Report

Once you're on track with your financial goals – such as retirement contributions or repaying student loan debt – you may find yourself exploring real estate investments in lieu of the stock market. Buying real estate as an investment can be lucrative, but it's also cash-intensive and carries risks.

As you weigh your options, consider the following points in your analysis.

Risk versus expected returns. Whether putting cash into the market or purchasing real estate, you need to assess the risk versus expected returns. Traditional equity investments are much easier to analyze in this way. You have historical data, and although past performance is not indicative of future results, you have a bit more control over how much risk you're exposed to when deciding what amount to invest, the asset allocation and so on. Investing in single stocks versus an index fund is a calculated risk some are willing to take in search of higher expected returns.

The risks when buying real estate can be much harder to quantify. While there is data available, such as comparable home prices in the area and average rents, unpredictable changes in the market can be costly. When investing in the equity market, your risk of loss is limited to your initial investment. This isn't the case with real estate – you could wind up owing the bank more than the value of your property if the market experiences a downturn, or even due to changes that negatively impact a neighborhood.

For landlords, vacancy and repairs can eat into profits. Once you calculate your expected mortgage, operating costs, taxes and maintenance, how much can you expect to earn in net rental income? The answer for every investor will be different, but for some, the anticipated return will not be worth the risk and effort involved in owning real estate.

Required capital. Virtually anyone can invest in traditional equity assets. Some shares can be very inexpensive and you can often determine the volume as well. The same cannot be said for real estate. To purchase a property, you need to either come up with a down payment yourself, or enlist partners to invest with you. Typically, you need to put down 20 percent for a traditional mortgage, and although various programs can help you to put down a smaller percentage, there are fewer options for investment properties.

The initial cash outlay is what deters many would-be real estate investors, as you could easily spend upwards of $100,000 on a down payment and initial repairs. Furthermore, real estate requires additional capital to maintain the property, often not at the owner's behest. With stocks, you can make a one-time investment or purchase additional shares later, at your discretion.

Taxes. Another aspect to consider when deciding to invest in real estate or the stock market is taxes. If you own property, you will be required to pay property taxes every quarter, based on the assessed value as determined by the city or country. This is included in your mortgage payment. Whether you want to flip the property or hold onto it as a landlord, you will also have to pay tax on the sale or rental proceeds.

There are certain tax benefits unique to owning real estate as a landlord, however. The interest expense on your mortgage is tax deductible, along with operating expenses, property taxes, insurance and depreciation. Exactly how much you can deduct will likely depend on the rental income. In most situations, under the passive activity loss rules, you cannot write off deductions that are more than the rental income, which would generate a loss. Working with a CPA can be very helpful, particularly when investment properties or multiple residences are involved.

Stocks have tax consequences as well; first, you are required to pay a capital gains tax on any profits you made from selling stock. Furthermore, even without a sale, you are also required to pay a tax on any dividends you receive.

Inflation. Real estate can be a potential hedge against inflation as historically, rental rates and home prices rise with inflation. This provides a potential inflation hedge for both your rental income and sale of the property. Since your mortgage payments will not increase with inflation, it offers a benefit over time.

Traditional equity investments are not as directly linked to inflationary measures.
Although prices do tend to rise over time, the market cannot offer the same potential
inflation protection as real estate.

Time. Another factor to consider when choosing to invest in real estate or the stock market is to factor in your time as a cost during the analysis. While you do need to do some research when deciding which funds to buy, you can purchase traditional equity investments in a matter of moments. There is a lot more time required in buying and maintaining a property, as well as managing any improvements. As a Landlord, you
will be on call for the tenants as problems arise. Hiring a property manager is an option, but depending on the size of your property, could eliminate your profit margin.

With the right property, neighborhood location and cash reserves, investing in real estate can be a great option. Many investors are drawn to the ongoing "coupon" payment of rental income, and as a long-term strategy, the ultimate sale of the property can fund a large portion of their retirement. If you're considering whether you should invest in the equity market or buy an investment property, carefully weigh these factors and determine whether your expected income is worth the risk it carries, especially in light of other investment options.
 

Steve Sloboda – Managing Broker – Windermere Real Estate – Professional Partners
stevesloboda.com – 253-988-3120 – sloboda@windermere.com

 

 

Posted on August 25, 2015 at 11:47 am
Steve Sloboda | Category: Chambers Bay, Real Estate News, Shameless Self Promotion, Suggestions, Tips, University Place | Tagged , , , , , , ,

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